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Catalytic Transfer Hydrogenation of CO2 to Potassium Formate using Glycerol as a Hydrogen Source

Technology #017-053-voutchkova

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Researchers
Adelina Voutchkova-Kostal, Assistant Professor of Chemistry,
Research Interests include catalysis, green chemistry, and Organometallic Chemistry
External Link (home.gwu.edu)
Matthew Thomas Finn
Ph.D. student at George Washington University. He is working under Prof. Voutchkova-Kostal.
Jacob Mark Heltzel, Post Doc Researcher
Managed By
Jerry Comanescu
Licensing Associate jcomanescu@gwu.edu (202) 994-8975
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Provisional Patent Application Filed
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Voutchkova 017-053 [PDF]

To simultaneously transform COand glycerol, two low-value by-products, into formate and lactate can be highly economically attractive. Presently, however, it is challenging to achieve the reaction on an industrial scale.

GW researchers developed novel single-site supported heterogeneous catalysts that can simultaneously convert COand glycerol into formate and lactate under batch or continuous flow conditions. The novel single-site supported heterogeneous catalysts consist of Ir or Ru N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) that are functionalized with sulfonates. In addition, synthetic hydrotalcite can be used as a non-inert supporting structure to these Ir or Ru based catalysts.  

To date, GW researchers are the first to convert COinto formate under a CO2–glycerol continuously flow system. Compared with previous processes, this new discovery generates less low-value by-products and has a higher activity. Initial research results are promising for scale-up synthesis competitive with existing industrial productions of formate and lactate.

Applications: simultaneously covert COand glycerol into high value formate and lactate.

Advantages:

· Simultaneously conversion

· First to achieve COtransfer hydrogenation in a gas-liquid flow system

· High potential for industrial-scale continuous process

· Occurs at a lower temperature and pressure than previous processes, thus safer and more economical  

· Reduce greenhouse emissions